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and not give your money to a government that's inefficient. >> sean: all of the artists can step up and give their money to government. >> exactly. i'd like to see john boehner give up his social security. >> you can donate your money to charity. you don't need to give it to the government. >> sean: greta is next. see you tomorrow night. >> greta: tonight speaker newt gingrich tells fellow republicans to get a grip. the former speaker of the house calling the fiscal cliff a fantasy that will appear out of nowhere just like the land of oozdid. speaker gingrich is here to tell us about his message for the gop. but first rush limbaugh has a message for democrats. >> you want to go after rich people? go after yourselves, democrats. start with your own perks. show us you've got some skin in the game instead of blaming everybody else. >> no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house the last two weeks. >> we're not going to kick the can down the road. this is no time for delay. >> how gutless is it to blame the taxpayers? >> compromise is necessa
>> according to a group of open government advocates, the obama administration's efforts and government transparency are mixed. the sunlight foundation held a forum on whether president obama lifted to his pledge to have the most open government in american history. this discussion is 90 minutes. >> good morning. welcome to the kayseri committee and transparency event on transparency in the obama presidency. i am daniel schuman with the sunlight foundation. welcome. there are many meanings of transparency. i'm not going to get into all of them today, but i'm sure there will be many different aspects. their widely divergent opinions on the successes of the obama administration and i hope to explore some of those today. president obama made a number of promises when he was running for president. a number are still available on during the course of the administration, new issues came up. everything from campaign finance disclosure to dealing with the lawsuit and others on visitors logs. there's been a lot of changes during the course of the administration. what i
of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending. >> despite that prognosis for rates and the fact that we're now matching the record lows here, the
. you don't get them through a government rule that lets the company reach in your wallet and take money. the kinds of profits that we're >> brown: after the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama administration is re-using digital information gathered for the campaign to rally support now. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for pubc broadcaing. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with more talk of avoiding the much-discussed fiscal cliff. but as november wound down, the president suggested an agreement on taxes and spending could come in time for the holidays. >> i believe that both parties can agree on a frame work that does that in the coming weeks.
? >> reporter: let's show you some of the savings when it comes to government spending. first of all, they put about $600 billion in what the republicans are calling health savings. we understand -- we don't have details. we understand much of that comes from medicare, things that we've heard from republicans over and over like raising the eligibility age, means testing, things like that. so then we have about $600 billion in essentially spending cuts, half from mandatory spending, half from discretionary spending. this is the other very interesting thing that's new. $200 billion from revising the consumer price index. that sounds very technical. but it has very real world consequences because it very much could affect the money, the checks that social security recipients in particular get every single month because it effectively changes inflation so it changes the formula from what they would get. >> significant differences between the white house proposal on this part of the equation as well as on the tax equation. the politics behind this latest republican counterproposal, are they just go
as an individual project. this strategy is called regional government man to rent this one that deserves more attention. madam chair and colleagues, i think you've concluded your draft of water resources bill in which i appreciate and i hope we can address that later this year. unfortunately, other areas where this will protect it and saw. this first photo -- this is a new bridge over the indian river inland. you can ask the atlantic ocean to the delaware. that's a new bridge could be spent over $200 million on the bridge in the last several years. a lot of federal money, quite a bit of state. this is the old bridge. it disappeared. it's gone. this is a highway to the old bridge. ron. four months ago people make their way up and down the east coast. today the bridge is completely gone along with highway approaches. the new bridge are threatened and we want to make sure we've made a $200 million investment that we don't use the bridge. until the bridge can work underwater. unfortunately you can't get to the bridge and the beaches of rio to the easter pÂtÉ densities to be there argonne and th
. syrians have the right to choose their government, the president, and any individual to run the world. as these ideologies are conflicting right now, that is normal. we see that in egypt. each side tries to extend its power through institutions, through the constitution. i think this is a healthy discussion, especially after 40 years of dictatorship. the people are not used to sharing their opinions and hearing other opinions. they need some time to be able to reconcile all of the different ideologies. at the end, i believe in the syrian people that they will be able to end the assad regime. >> thank you. i would like to debate on the ideologies and the syrian opposition. i will let you go into this issue. can you talking about the role played by the syrian muslim brotherhood within the opposition. the majority of the seats still being that of the muslim brotherhood. the leaders are close -- what is the role played by them? >> i think the united states has to deal with the reality with the rise of muslim brotherhood and the whole region, not only in to nietzsche, egypt. the difference
's grave for the obvious fact that we believe that the assad government has weapononized chemical and biological agents and put them in a position where they can be used fairly rapidly. as you look back over the 20 months of this conflict, this follows a series of events, one leading to the other which people said could not happen. this began, remember, with peaceful demonstrations. and when assad was unable to control them or suppress, he began to fire on his own people and they began to defend themselves in a very unfair fight which everyone thought we should take sides on the side of freedom and give the freedom fighters the weapons with which they could fight. it happened much too late. and people said, at least he's not using his air force to attack his own people and then he began to attack his own people from the air. now more than 40,000 killed. so when we see the government of assad weaponize chemical and biological agents and put them in bombs, we know this is a leader with no limits and unfortunately he follows his father who proved capable of using weapons against his
this to a c.e.o. in the crowd. so maybe david, you could take this. what role should the government play in the future of -- your business is transportation, too -- in the transportation business with this? look, we are mired in conversations about a fiscal cliff on the very right now. we're talking about long-term infrastructure build-out, a long-term energy plan. what role should c.e.o.'s have and the federal government have in making sure this gets done? >> this is the perfect opportunity for the federal government and for state governments to work together to achieve a common goal, right? there's plenty of times where, when we run a business, our interests might not coalesce with the interests of either of the parties. as fred said, this is the opportunity that we have never had in this country before, where you can have consumer, the business and the governments all working together to take advantage of this huge resource, if you want to call it saudi america. from a waste management perspective, for us it makes so much sense, because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 equi
of them who signed the pledge they want to slink government. i listen to c-span. they're so upset about ben gauzey, which they should be upset about, they don't take into account that the state department has a shoestring budget. people are very upset about the compounding, but the f.d.a. operates on a shoestring budget because they have been shrinking government. host: so anne, do you see room for cut? caller: yes, i see room for budget cuts in the defense department. i'm a senior citizen facing retirement, and i really do believe in some means testing for social security. it's an insurance program. and there are people, you're just like with your health insurance, if you're really lucky and you've done the right things, and you're really healthy, you're not complaining that you've paid for health insurance. and then the people who need it, there's money for them. so it's the same thing. there are many people who have benefited greatly, sometimes from unfairnesses that rich people have bought for themselves and our country. but your people have benefited, and so you know why should the
back to state and local governments. but during an era of fiscal restraint and global warming, it's high time that we start this conversation in earnest. how big do you want your fema to be? how generous your disaster relief payments and how much do you want to pay for it? in today's "new york times" op-ed section, there's an article that points out potential liability for flood insurance alone is $1.25 trillion. second only to the liability for social security. right now we have arguably the worst of both worlds. the federal government responds to disaster usually paying too much for the wrong people to do the wrong things. we provide federal money to put people back in harm's way and sometimes provide infrastructure to make future risky development worse. we often take remedial action, like for theifying beaches, a temporary solution, that can actually accelerate erosion elsewhere, shift storm damage down the coast to another spot or more serious flooding downriver. by giving the illusion of protection, more people locate in dangerous areas and the vicious cycle is repeated with
the israeli government saying that this is a unilateral move that violates the oslo court, that the house indians are aiming to join the international criminal court, and it preempts the united nations. i think for israel right now, the concern is on the diplomatic outcome as well, how countries will be voting, and the high level of support that palestinians would get from the international community. >> what about on the ground and the occupation? how will this change life for the palestinians? >> have asked many palestinians what they expect, and most said they are aware of the symbolic character, but there will still be settlements. there will still be the israeli occupation. basically, there will be no changes on the ground, but my impression is that many do support this. although some are skeptical because there's no other choice, no peace process, whatever, but they hope this will at least give them some recognition of their rights eventually. >> thanks so much. to syria now. the country has gone offline. according to a firm that monitors global internet traffic, syrian public tv ha
the tax burden that americans are paying to the federal government. given that, do you support the proposal put forward by john boehner? >> well, because the proposal is significantly amorphous, you could get those revenues through economic growth and we don't really have things nailed down, i don't want to talk about a hypothetical, but there is a danger that when you put revenues on the table, even revenues through economic growth, if you grew at 4% a year, reagan levels, instead of 2%, french levels or obama levels, you would net $5 trillion in additional revenue to the government, you could pay down all of obama's additional debt by higher levels of growth, not raising taxes. so there's a lot of money to be gotten from growth. how they do this, we have to see it written down, but because the obama administration and spokesmen have been so emphatic about all taxes and no spending restraint, all taxes and actually spend -- another stimulus, another solyndra stimulus program -- >> i don't think they've mentioned solyndra, grover, but i'm sure they appreciate your mentioning of
governance, we would blanch. for instance, if egypt says you can only be elected president of egypt with 60% of the vote or if we said here in the united states, you can only be elected president with 60% of the vote, imagine the absolute chaos that would throw american democratic processes into. as the man who wrote the book literally, defending the filibuster, make the case why we should have this institution at all. >> first off, will et me observe that we do elect presidents with less than 50% majority, even presidents who didn't get the most votes. the filibuster isn't the only odd role we have. >> i agree. i'm going after them one by one. >> the long history of the senate more than 200 years filibuster has been around for a good deal of that. the role that the senate has played historically in our system is it's the last place where minority rights are protected. and the twin pillars, the foundation of what makes the senate a unique body is unlimited debate and unfeterred amendment. in the house of representatives, debate is limited, often debates are not permitted at all. in the sena
for the u.s. government taking care of senior citizens and we saw it in the 30's and the 70's with the oil shock and did see the birth rate in the united states decline. it's higher than italy and japan, but it's not good for an aging society when the birth rate declines and it's shocking-- >> and support ourselves. stuart: yes. >> it's shocking that the birth rate for immigrants is dropping, too. stuart: astonishing, thanks, ladies. hold on the gold report a little early this morning, where are we now? 1,725.10, we're down just $4 this friday morning and as you know, there's a fight on capitol hill all about this fiscal cliff and the media is, as always, in the democrat's corner. that will be my opinion. and mark is next. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] they are a glowing example of what it means to be the best. and at this special time of year, they shine even brighter. come to the winter event and get the mercedes-benz you've always wished for, now for an exceptional price. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer lease a 2013 glk350 for $399 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. >>
of government, and the president is proposing to grow it more. to spend more. the problem is isn't tax policy, mr. speaker. the problem is spending. you know, mr. speaker, we hear a lot about fairness. i want to talk a little bit about that now. i'm going to switch to tax policy because that's what everybody seems to be obsessed with in the media. i want to make sure we dispel some of the myths of what's going on there. i went to as i'm apt to do, mr. speaker, and printed out what fair is. they said free from bias, dishonesty, or injustice. the first definition. free from bias, dishonesty, or injustice. and two, legitimately thought, pursued, done, or given proper under the rules. fair. but i think we all support fairness. i'm certain that we do, but i'm absolute certain what president obama believes is fair is different from what the people i represent believe is fair. and what i brought here, mr. speaker, is a chart from the joint committee on taxation, that's the group here on capitol hill that is in charge of measuring all the tax policy, it's a nonpartisan group, they just
now, in the hands of authorities. >>> an alert for parents. the government issuing a warning about a popular product, after the deaths of five newborns. >>> and rover behind the wheel? yep. teaching dogs to drive. >>> and good morning, everyone. we begin with that developing story from syria's civil war. credible, new concerns about the use of chemical weapons by syrian forces. >> syria's chemical weapons stockpile is believed to be one of the largest in the world. and there's word that regime forces might be ready to use it. we spoke with alex marquardt a short time ago, from the turkey/syria border. >> reporter: it seems that syria went through the preparation phase, loading components of the highly-toxic sarin gas. syria doesn't even acknowledge that it has chemical weapons. they've said that they would never use them against their own people. but one top official warned this summer that they would only be used against what he called external aggression. >> and that sarin gas that alex just mentioned, it is extremely toxic. a single drop can kill a person in a matter of moments.
not be conceding that the federal government needs more money, negotiating with ourselves, and treating the president's proposal like it's serious. >> very critical of john boehner. and demint's press release aimed squarely at john boehner. $800 billion tax hike will destroy jobs, allow washington to spend more. as you all know, john boehner put an $800 billion tax hike as a center of his proposal. so john boehner got rejected from the white house, which wants another $800 billion on top of that in tax hikes and then rejected by the right wing of his own party which wants absolutely no tax hikes at all. so unlike harry reid, i actually feel genuine sympathy for john boehner. so kudos, speaker, for showing deserters or desenters who is boss. boehner stripped house members who opposed key committee assignments today. and earlier i spoke with one republican leader in the house who himself has been out of step with boehner in recent days. deputy whip congressman tom cole of oklahoma. he said the gop should agree to obama's proposal to extend bush tax rates for households that make less than
reform debate, which may be apocryphal, "keep government hands off my medicare." the big tea party uprising was in large part a reaction to the idea, quote/unquote, of socialized medicine. it was the affordable care act, and the government, quote, takeover of health care, that fanned the flames of the post-obama tea party protest. but, of course, most of the actual republicans who were actually elected back then were elected because they ran ads like this. >> congressman brad ellsworth said he would protect our seniors. but when he got to washington, congressman ellsworth voted for the largest cuts in medicare history, over $500 billion. robin carnahan supports $500 billion in medicare cuts, hurting seniors most. rand paul doesn't support higher medicare deductibles for seniors. conway distracts with negative ads to hide his support for obama care, which cuts medicare by $500 billion. >> that was 2010. fast forward to this year's election and the same principle carries through. each side tried to convince voters that the other guy wanted to take the hatchet to medicare. >> the bigg
is going to be done down the road by the government. i don't know anyone who would ever believe such a promise. i don't expect that the republicans would accept that offer from the president. i just don't see that as ever happening in the city. let me ask you -- >> i'm sorry. republicans basically have to say our principles here are correct. our whole analysis of the economy is correct. we need massive spending decreases, and they've got to stick with that. if they can get decent spending increases and have to agree to additional revenue, fine. if they get pushed in the position the president is trying to push them, they stick with their principles, you know, and a year and a half from now go to the electorate with that. it worked in 10. it will probably work in 14. it will be a shame because it will do a lot of damage to our economy in between, but the president has that really on his shoulders. he's the leader. >> greta: mayor, thank you, sir. >> thank you. >> greta: breaking news out of syria. the syrian government mixing components for the deadly sarin nerve gas. the ranking
been cut. the government and opposition are blaming each other for the shutdown. whatever the truth, syria's regime is battling these men for its very survival. president assad's helicopters are being shot down. and even a mig jet was filmed tumbling from the sky. this rebel boasting that he's downed both a helicopter and a mig within 24 hours. these surface to air missiles have been looted from captured military bases. what do we first with it a voice can be heard asking. not everybody knows how this newfound firepower works. yet this islamist brigade near damascus now has one. while near aleppo an entirm air defense system seems to have fallen to the so-called daoud battalion which is affiliated however loosely with al qaeda. "these are assad's missiles," say the cameraman and "we have taken them." london and washington may have refused to arm these rebels. but armed they are like never before. >> suarez: and margaret warner takes the story from there. >> warner: for more on today's developments and what they mean for syria's president bashar al assad, i'm joined by andrew tabler,
'm worried because the only part of the federal government that obama administration appears to be willing to cut is the defense department. >> education would be cut by $2.3 billion. medicare payments to hospitals would be slashed by 5.6 billion. and custom and border patrol would lose $823 million. >> the point is to make it painful so they want to cut with a scalpel than a m machete. but it's not clear they will. >> bret: please join chris wallace for "fox news sunday" this weekend. he will have an exclusive interview with house speaker john boehner on the fiscal cliff negotiations. chris will talk to tim geithner. a "fox news sunday" you do not want to miss. check your local listings. consumer spending was down .2 of a percentage point in october. the dow finished ahead. the nasdaq lost two. europe's economy remains in the tank. 17 euro zone countries have a combined unemployment rate of 11.7%. that is the highest since the introduction of the common currency in 1999. 18.7 million people are out of work for the euro zone. pain and greece have jobless rates of more than 25%. back at hom
christmas and new year's. they do understand how serious this is. that's what they're elect to do, govern, e. jon: matt, what i've seen own sunday shows both sides are hardening. >> i worked for a president who faced challenges when he went into his re-election with hurricane katrina. what can happen at beginning of second term, we saw this with ronald reagan, we've seen it with so many presidents, their second terms seem to be a little bit of disappointment, don't live up to what they accomplish in the first term. one of the problems with president obama he rolled out of this election thinking he won the election, he can can set the terms of conversation. he needs to remember the republicans control the house of representatives. they understand their political fate is tied to working with the president and being bipartisan. there are certain things they >> first of all, let me say that republicans and democrats have to stop drawing lines in the sand. they have to get in a room and talk to each other. we'll have to make difficult decisions. we have to increase revenue and we have to reduce g
was down today in syria and some traffic was halted at the airport in damascus as rebels battled government forces. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, margaret warner examines what the latest clashes tell us about the strength of the assad regime and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern danceo contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to
expect of our government, is honesty. so that we can, as the people being served, so we can judge the decisions being made. and jay carney, just so obstinate and arrogant really, in his replies and in his exarchals with the media over this. if i were a member of the media, being talked to and scolded as jay carney does to them, i would be quite offended and it would make me want to be an even better reporter and better investigator of what the facts truly are with this libya tragedy. >> the dirty little secret in washington, on both sides of the aisle, you will lose access -- you have to -- you have to use good judgment. i am not saying that you sell your soul on the administration -- >> so what? so what if you lose access to obama? you know why people-- the american people don't care if a reporter is not going to have access to the obama administration because what's coming back as a result of having that privileged, powerful access is this lack of transparency. it's more confusion. it's more uncertainty and it's lies! so why in the world would a reporter be concerned about getti
they want to and also, let's be real, because the government encourages through the tax code. it is reported in bloomberg in 2009 households with incomes of more than $200,000 claimed almost $60 billion in charitable deductions or 20% of total charitable giving in the u.s. that year. he goes on to site one study that found charitable donations are cut almost dollar for dollar to the increase in the donor's tax bill. so that could be a $60 billion cut to charity coffers. other studies said it could be half that though still likely in many billions of dollars of cuts to charities. that is the reality behind base broadening rate lowering tax reform. not magic. more of a magic trick that leads to a distraction to distract the audience from where the increases really are. but it is tax increase. on charitable giving, buying and state and local taxes. it is a an increase on marginal rates. that's a fair argument to have but is the argument we need to be having? joining me now to have some of that argument is chris hansen president of the american cancer society. the cancer action network. thank yo
's the bottom line. be straight with the people that's all we expect of our government. honesty. so we can as the people being served so we can judge the decisions being made. jay carney, just so objects it in and arrogant really in -- obstinate and arrogant in his replies and exchange with the media. if i were a member of the media being scolded as carney does i would be offended and would it make me want to be a better reporter and investigator of what the facts are with this libya tragedy. >> greta: dirty secret in washington on both sides of the aisle is access, you will lose access, you have to use good judgment. i'm not saying you sell your soul to the administration. >> so what if you lose access to obama. you know why people don't want to lose -- the american people don't care if a reporter isn't going to have access to the obama administration because what is coming back as a result of having that privilege powerful access. lack of transparency, more confusion, more uncertainy and lights. why in the world would a reporter be concerned about whether they are going to get more of th
government has been harassing him. >> they have attempted to charge me with every crime from running a laboratory without a license to hiring security guards without a license, to having improper paperwork for my company and most recently the murder of my neighbor. >>trace: the neighbor complains about his dogs and then turned up dead shortly after somebody poisoned the dogs. mcafee says he is seeking political asylum in guatemala and can prove the belize government is corrupt. now a contributing editor for "travel and leisure." i am not sure peopled that why he is seeking asylum in guatemala because he wasn't brought up on charges in belize, why move next door? >>guest: well, it is strange and bizarre story from the beginning. he never was charged formally in belize. he is a "person of interest" only. i talked to the belize police and they confirmed under their law they can detain him for questioning for up to 48 hours so there was reason for him to be on the lam. he carried out being on the lam in an unusual way talking to the press and inviting reporters with him. he made the mist
. we need new thinking and renewed efforts from all americans. >> big government is not effective government. big government has never worked. >> you will see how two potential presidential hopefuls are laying out their vision for their party's future, that's next. [ male announcer ] with 160 more miles per tank, the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. [ "the odd couple" theme playing ] humans. even when we cross our "t"s and dot our "i"s, we still run into problems -- mainly other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won't go up due to your first accident, and new car replacement, where if you total your new car, we give you the money for a new one. call... to talk to an insurance expert about everything else that comes standard with our base auto policy. [ tires squeal ] and if you get into an accident and use one of our
the size of government. and i welcome that. he's choosing to do it outside now rather than inside the senate but he's had a huge, positive influence on the senate and we're going to continue to see that for years to come. >> senator, this may seem like a simple question, but i wonder, and a lot of people do is the senate from your perspective, is the senate a difficult place to be if you are someone who comes from executive background or someone committed to getting things done? is it a frustrating place to exist, day in and day out? >> i would say to you, i saw the article that you wrote earlier today, governors do -- who are used to having their own planes and flying around their states and controlling their own schedules do find it more challenging in the senate. i came from the state senate in wyoming. i enjoyed the opportunity to work with people on both side of the aisle to discuss the issues and continue to try to move proposals forward that i believe in about. i believe this is a place where you can make an effective difference in the direction of the country. >> now, let'
is the minister, the father is the father, the sun is the son and jeff government. so if everyone in his, and i should say or her place though confucianism doesn't leave much fun for the element. and that within the region and with the world as china looks at, a sense of harmony, japan would be law, that sense of harmony and how you would achieve it is that their frustration is that the work is not just acquiescing to the notion that they are a rich country, that they are returning, that they're powerful, that they want respect. and they want to see the world kind of step back and give it greater latitude, but doesn't see this. this is what i think whether i personally think we are on a collision course. because when you look at what china's expectations of the world are, you also look at its paranoia, you look at jim, i'd love to hear utah, you're such an expert insider, what's going on in the cyber world. you see something which seems hard to me, despite her best efforts in not one to replace history, that the rise of a great power usually and often leads to messiness. usually and often leads
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 96 (some duplicates have been removed)